Episode 11

full
Published on:

11th Jan 2024

Bite-Sized Client Experiences (First Date Offers) with Laura Robinson | 011

In this episode, marketing mentor Laura Robinson explains the concept of 'First Date Offers'. These are short, chargeable, bite-sized experiences designed to attract potential clients and give them a taster of your high-priced services. Laura recommends creating a First Date Offer that's fun and comfortable for you to deliver, ensuring you avoid too broad a scope, follow up promptly, and limit its availability to create an urgent need. She also notes these offers are a low-risk way to differentiate your business in your industry and help you attract customers. Laura illustrates her concept with examples from multiple industries, including architecture.

Today's Guest...

Laura Robinson is a marketing mentor for expertise-based businesses. She has been working in marketing and copywriting for more than 14 years. In that time, she has helped hundreds of business owners create and sell online offers, and to make their online marketing more effective. She’s delivered masterclasses for Enterprise Nation, Membership Academy, and Andrew & Pete’s Atomic Community. She has also shared her expertise as a speaker at Erin Wong’s Momentum Day, and Atomicon, one of Europe’s largest business conferences.

Episode Highlights...

00:00 Introduction to the Episode

00:31 About the Host and the Show

00:54 Introducing the Guest: Laura Robinson

01:58 Laura's Unique Experience as a Marine Mammal Medic

03:37 Introduction to First Date Offers

03:49 The Concept and Creation of First Date Offers

05:17 Explaining Voxer and its Benefits

06:53 The Impact of First Date Offers on Business

08:28 Laura's Experience with Home Renovation and Architects

11:54 Brainstorming First Date Offers for Architecture Practices

20:22 Pricing and Pitfalls of First Date Offers

27:28 Summarising the Concept of First Date Offers

30:25 Laura's Favorite Place and Conclusion

Key Takeaways...

👉 First Date Offers are small, chargeable, one-to-one experiences that you can offer potential clients. It has to be enjoyable for you, quick to deliver, provide value to your customers, and can lead to selling higher-priced services.

👉 First Date Offers act as a sample of what it is like to work with you and can lead to hiring you for more extensive services. It is recommended that the delivery method of this offer should mirror your standard mode of communication with clients.

👉 Pricing for your First Date Offers should be determined in such a way that there is no resentment from your side for delivering the service. Think creatively about how you make it easy for people to say yes to work with you. 

👉 First Date Offers can help you filter the types of clients you'd like to work with more.

👉 For your First Date Offers to be successful, it's crucial to stay within a narrow scope. Trying to offer too much within this set time can leave all parties feeling dissatisfied.

👉 Follow up after the First Date Offer is essential because it helps you to stay in touch with the client who might become a higher-paying customer in the future.

👉 In terms of availability, these offers should be limited in order to generate some sense of urgency in the customers.

👉 The First Date Offer shouldn't be about buying a certain amount of time but about getting a particular problem solved or a question answered. It's not reliant on the time taken but about delivering value to the client.

👉 Ensure the First Date Offer is something that appeals to the type of client you want to attract. This can help you shape your business to only work with clients who you feel you would enjoy working with.

Links Mentioned In The Episode...

If you're running a business that needs to fit around your other life challenges, priorities, and adventures...

Sign up for Laura’s free Comfy Business Newsletter at http://worditude.co.uk/newsletter

Laura’s Website

http://worditude.co.uk/

Laura’s Facebook Page

http://facebook.com/worditude

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In The Next Episode...

Next time Jon chats with Architect and Architectural Technologist, Ann Vanner, about her experience of returning to practice.

Transcript
Jon Clayton:

How would you like to have a chargeable bite sized

Jon Clayton:

one-to-one experience that you can offer your potential clients?

Jon Clayton:

That is quick and fun for you to deliver and helps to sell

Jon Clayton:

your higher price services.

Jon Clayton:

That's exactly what we're going to help you with today in this episode

Jon Clayton:

of architecture business club.

Jon Clayton:

The weekly podcast for solo and small firm architecture practice owners,

Jon Clayton:

just like you who want to build a profitable future proof architecture

Jon Clayton:

business that fits around their life.

Jon Clayton:

I'm the host John Clayton.

Jon Clayton:

If you want to get notified when a releasing your episode and

Jon Clayton:

get access to free resources and exclusive offers, then go to Mr.

Jon Clayton:

John clayton.co.uk forward slash ABC.

Jon Clayton:

And sign up to my free weekly email newsletter.

Jon Clayton:

Now let's discuss first date offers.

Jon Clayton:

In this episode, I'm joined by Laura Robinson.

Jon Clayton:

Laura is a marketing mentor for expertise based businesses.

Jon Clayton:

She's been working in marketing and copywriting for more than 14 years.

Jon Clayton:

And in that time, she's helped hundreds of business owners create

Jon Clayton:

and sell online offers and to make their online marketing more effective.

Jon Clayton:

She's delivered masterclasses for Enterprise Nation, Membership Academy,

Jon Clayton:

and Andrew and Pete's Atomic community.

Jon Clayton:

And she's also shared her expertise as a speaker Bye.

Jon Clayton:

At Erin Wong's Momentum Day and Atomicon, one of Europe's

Jon Clayton:

largest business conferences.

Jon Clayton:

If you're running a business that needs to fit around your other life

Jon Clayton:

challenges, priorities, and adventures, sign up for Laura's free, comfy

Jon Clayton:

business newsletter at weirditude.

Jon Clayton:

co.

Jon Clayton:

uk forward slash newsletter.

Jon Clayton:

Laura, welcome to Architecture Business Club.

Laura Robinson:

Hello.

Laura Robinson:

Thank you for having me.

Jon Clayton:

It's great to have you here today.

Jon Clayton:

I'm a big fan of yours, uh, as you know, hopefully.

Jon Clayton:

Before we just dive into the topic, we're going to talk about though.

Jon Clayton:

I've got to ask you about this.

Jon Clayton:

You're a volunteer marine mammal medic.

Jon Clayton:

Um, could you tell me a little bit about that?

Laura Robinson:

I can.

Laura Robinson:

It sounds like the name feels like it makes it sound like a lot

Laura Robinson:

more hands on than it really is.

Laura Robinson:

I volunteer with a charity called the British Divers Marine Life

Laura Robinson:

Rescue, even though there's absolutely no diving involved.

Laura Robinson:

It's kind of a legacy name.

Laura Robinson:

And, uh, we work all over the UK coastline.

Laura Robinson:

And if there's any marine mammals that are in distress and they need help

Laura Robinson:

out of the water, so they're, they're.

Laura Robinson:

Then out of the water for some reason, um, I can get called

Laura Robinson:

and go and help with that.

Laura Robinson:

So the people who volunteer up in Scotland, they typically

Laura Robinson:

get like whales and dolphins.

Laura Robinson:

Uh, where I am in East Anglia, I have only been called out to seals.

Laura Robinson:

Um, and that's usually during the pupping season when, uh, seal pups are weaned from

Laura Robinson:

their mums quite early, a few weeks old.

Laura Robinson:

And the vast majority of them go off to fish successfully and gain body weight

Laura Robinson:

and go and live independent, happy lives.

Laura Robinson:

But some of them aren't so lucky and they might sustain injuries, storm damage.

Laura Robinson:

They just fail to thrive, really.

Laura Robinson:

Um, and so we get called out to pick them up and take them to a wildlife

Laura Robinson:

hospital where they get fed up until they're a good body weight and

Laura Robinson:

then released back into the wild.

Jon Clayton:

Oh, that sounds awesome.

Jon Clayton:

Have you ever been tempted to take one home?

Laura Robinson:

Absolutely not.

Laura Robinson:

They are so beautiful to look at, but they really smell and they're very bitey.

Laura Robinson:

It's the same.

Laura Robinson:

They, uh, they have a good public image that they don't really

Laura Robinson:

deserve if you get up close to them.

Jon Clayton:

Yeah, fair enough.

Jon Clayton:

Okay.

Jon Clayton:

So best viewed from a distance.

Laura Robinson:

Definitely.

Laura Robinson:

Yeah, we don't want to get as close as I do.

Jon Clayton:

Okay.

Jon Clayton:

Well, um, we're going to talk about something called first date offers.

Jon Clayton:

So this is something that the listeners probably aren't familiar with.

Jon Clayton:

This is a concept that, that you've created.

Jon Clayton:

Could you tell me what is a first date offer and, and how

Jon Clayton:

did you come up with the idea?

Laura Robinson:

It was an accidental invention.

Laura Robinson:

I don't mind doing discovery calls.

Laura Robinson:

You know, you have like a, just a free chat with someone who might be interested

Laura Robinson:

in buying your higher price service.

Laura Robinson:

I don't mind doing them, but they tend to be a bit ambiguous.

Laura Robinson:

They go on for a while.

Laura Robinson:

You give away the whole farm.

Laura Robinson:

Not made any money.

Laura Robinson:

And sometimes the, um, potential client feels a bit awkward about

Laura Robinson:

booking in for a free chat as if it's a trap or they're just going to be

Laura Robinson:

sold to, or they just don't want to take your time for free because that

Laura Robinson:

feels, um, like unfair out of balance.

Laura Robinson:

I also see people selling these things like power hours or

Laura Robinson:

like one hour consultations, pick my brain type sessions.

Laura Robinson:

And I am not a fan of those at all.

Laura Robinson:

They are definitely way too ambiguous.

Laura Robinson:

They go on forever.

Laura Robinson:

They eat into your calendar.

Laura Robinson:

So you end up with like these.

Laura Robinson:

Messy slots of time that your brain is devoted to this one

Laura Robinson:

particular person, then you have to switch back to somebody else.

Laura Robinson:

Um, so I wanted something that was kind of in the middle where I could

Laura Robinson:

get to know someone, but they were paying for it and they were getting

Laura Robinson:

something of value from the session.

Laura Robinson:

And it was a good taster of what it was like to work with me as

Laura Robinson:

I've had that in the back of my mind for probably at least a year.

Laura Robinson:

I think knowing that there was this middle ground that I just

Laura Robinson:

didn't know what it looked like.

Laura Robinson:

And then I released a course that was called Marketing Game Plan and I thought,

Laura Robinson:

Oh, it would be fun to offer a 20 minute one to one Voxer chat with people who

Laura Robinson:

had a particular marketing dilemma that they wanted to talk over with me.

Jon Clayton:

Do you wanna just explain what a Voxer chat is to the listeners?

Laura Robinson:

So Voxer is an, uh, it's a walkie talkie base app.

Laura Robinson:

So a bit like WhatsApp or Facebook Messenger where you

Laura Robinson:

are able to leave voice notes.

Laura Robinson:

But on those platforms, when you leave the voice note, the person at the other

Laura Robinson:

end can't hear it until you finished, and then they listen and then they respond.

Laura Robinson:

And so you end up with this weird kind of lag and it's not like

Laura Robinson:

a telephone conversation and it feels awkward and it takes forever.

Laura Robinson:

With Voxer, it's real time.

Laura Robinson:

So they can hear when you're listening, when you're leaving a message, the person

Laura Robinson:

on the other end can hear real time, but they can also choose whether they play it

Laura Robinson:

back and listen again, or they think, Oh, I don't want to listen to that right now.

Laura Robinson:

They carry on with what they're doing.

Laura Robinson:

They come back.

Laura Robinson:

So for my very easily distracted brain, it's my preferred method of

Laura Robinson:

communication because I find it very hard to concentrate when someone's

Laura Robinson:

talking to me, they'll spark off an idea.

Laura Robinson:

And I'm, my brain's going like, Oh, this is great.

Laura Robinson:

Let's think about this thing.

Laura Robinson:

But they've carried on talking.

Laura Robinson:

I don't know.

Laura Robinson:

I didn't listen to the second half of what you said because I was

Laura Robinson:

thinking about the first thing, but with Voxer, I can do that.

Laura Robinson:

I can write notes.

Laura Robinson:

I can go off with whatever the first thing was, and then I can re listen

Laura Robinson:

to the message and pick up the second or third or fourth points before

Laura Robinson:

I get back to them with a more.

Laura Robinson:

Comprehensive message.

Laura Robinson:

So it's a slower flow of conversation than say a zoom chat, but faster than

Laura Robinson:

voice messaging on the other apps.

Laura Robinson:

So I could go on about it forever.

Laura Robinson:

Cause I absolutely love that form of communication.

Jon Clayton:

well that's probably, we could probably do a whole

Jon Clayton:

episode in the future about using Voxer because I love Voxer as well.

Jon Clayton:

So that's, you were using Voxer for that initial offer, that 20 minute

Jon Clayton:

conversation that you talked about.

Jon Clayton:

So let's just swing it back around to that then.

Laura Robinson:

So I'd only made it available to people who'd bought the

Laura Robinson:

course and it was very focused on.

Laura Robinson:

Do you like any kind of marketing?

Laura Robinson:

You're stuck with a marketing dilemma.

Laura Robinson:

You don't, you just don't know what to do next.

Laura Robinson:

You need to make a decision about a thing.

Laura Robinson:

And I just loved it.

Laura Robinson:

Like it, it made me come alive.

Laura Robinson:

I was in a bit of a funk at the time because it was January,

Laura Robinson:

February time this year.

Laura Robinson:

And I'm not good like January, February, not my good times of year at all.

Laura Robinson:

And I realized when I get to talk to people just for a

Laura Robinson:

short period of time, it, it.

Laura Robinson:

It reinvigorates me.

Laura Robinson:

It gives me ideas.

Laura Robinson:

It gives me inspiration.

Laura Robinson:

I love the reaction that you get from a 20 minute intense session at

Laura Robinson:

the end that the recipient or the client on the other end is just.

Laura Robinson:

Totally blown away by what we can achieve in 20 minutes.

Laura Robinson:

And so then that helps like pump me up as well.

Laura Robinson:

So I thought, Oh, I've got something here.

Laura Robinson:

And it turned out that some of those people wanted to go on and buy my

Laura Robinson:

higher priced one to one services.

Laura Robinson:

So I hadn't created it intentionally to fit this gap between a

Laura Robinson:

discovery call and a power hour.

Laura Robinson:

I just made it off the back of this course, but then I realized, Oh, this is,

Laura Robinson:

this is something like I love doing it.

Laura Robinson:

I'm definitely going to do this again.

Laura Robinson:

And it does feel that.

Laura Robinson:

Void in like my offers quite nicely.

Jon Clayton:

That sounds, sounds absolutely fantastic.

Jon Clayton:

It's funny how sometimes these great ideas do just happen accidentally, don't they?

Jon Clayton:

But it's, it's a really good idea.

Jon Clayton:

What I'd like to talk about actually is before we kind of dig more into

Jon Clayton:

first day offers I want to try and focus on how small firm architecture

Jon Clayton:

practices and, uh, sole practitioners working in architecture, how they

Jon Clayton:

can use this concept before we do that, though, I know that you've

Jon Clayton:

had an experience of doing your own.

Jon Clayton:

Home renovation projects.

Jon Clayton:

And I'd like to hear a little bit about the experience that you had working

Jon Clayton:

with the, the architectural firm.

Jon Clayton:

Could you tell me about those first interactions that you had

Jon Clayton:

with the architectural firms when you contacted perhaps one or two

Jon Clayton:

companies when you decided to, to renovate and extend your home?

Laura Robinson:

Yeah, it feels like ages ago now.

Laura Robinson:

When, and the whole process of even getting everyone in place and the

Laura Robinson:

mortgage and the permission and the architect and the builder, I don't

Laura Robinson:

even know how logistically we made that happen, but it took a couple of

Laura Robinson:

years to get everything lined up and my experience with, I contacted a couple

Laura Robinson:

of architects and they came around and they obviously didn't really want to.

Laura Robinson:

Do the job that they were humoring me because I'd asked for them to come.

Laura Robinson:

And initially we were looking at a loft conversion and whether

Laura Robinson:

that would be possible or not.

Laura Robinson:

And it wasn't, um, the architect we settled with was our builder.

Laura Robinson:

The builder we chose is someone that his dad had done my parents extension.

Laura Robinson:

So we live in quite a small village kind of town.

Laura Robinson:

Everybody knows everybody.

Laura Robinson:

And, um, So that was, for me, I wanted it to be someone that I really trusted

Laura Robinson:

and I was going to be leaving my house empty for a good few weeks at a time.

Laura Robinson:

You know, I was coming back every day, but I just wanted to be comfortable

Laura Robinson:

that it was someone that when we moved back into the house, we felt

Laura Robinson:

like it had been a good experience.

Laura Robinson:

We'd enjoyed the process, like that was my top priority.

Laura Robinson:

So I wanted it to be this particular group of builders above anything else.

Laura Robinson:

And so we chose them first and then we went with the architect that they were.

Laura Robinson:

Most familiar with working with, um, because they had

Laura Robinson:

such a great relationship.

Laura Robinson:

It made everything much easier.

Jon Clayton:

And what happened then once, once you decided you were going to use

Jon Clayton:

that architect, what actually happened?

Jon Clayton:

Did they, I'm just sort of thinking about what those first interactions were

Jon Clayton:

compared, uh, so we can try and relate these two things together, really.

Jon Clayton:

So I'm just wondering, like, what actually happened when you picked up

Jon Clayton:

the phone and, and contacted them?

Jon Clayton:

Did they come out and visit?

Jon Clayton:

Did you go to their office?

Jon Clayton:

Did you, they send you a fee proposal via email?

Jon Clayton:

What was the first things that happened when you got in

Laura Robinson:

So I don't, I still don't even know what the fee was

Laura Robinson:

because when you've decided that you're going to do the thing, it

Laura Robinson:

almost becomes irrelevant, doesn't it?

Laura Robinson:

I mean, not totally irrelevant, but in the end there were

Laura Robinson:

just numbers floating around.

Laura Robinson:

I was like, but all together, well, we have enough money.

Laura Robinson:

Yes.

Laura Robinson:

Okay.

Laura Robinson:

Then let's just get on with it.

Laura Robinson:

Um, so I don't know, and I wouldn't know like what the fees were

Laura Robinson:

compared to other people either.

Laura Robinson:

We just decided, I think it was very much like a relationship based project.

Laura Robinson:

So.

Laura Robinson:

We knew we were going with this person she came to the house and

Laura Robinson:

did all the measurements and stuff.

Laura Robinson:

And we chatted about what we, what I really enjoyed was talking about what

Laura Robinson:

we wanted to achieve by doing it.

Laura Robinson:

So, she wasn't, you know, because I had an idea if we're going to put this

Laura Robinson:

extension on the back and these bedrooms are going to go here and she was.

Laura Robinson:

Taking me up a level and saying, okay, you don't need to decide that.

Laura Robinson:

Like, you don't need to decide where the bedrooms go or where

Laura Robinson:

the walls are going to be.

Laura Robinson:

You tell me what it is that you want to achieve when you move back into the house.

Laura Robinson:

So that was a really helpful experience to kind of hand it over a bit.

Laura Robinson:

And then she came back to me with two or three floor plans.

Laura Robinson:

One of which would have been the most amazing master suite

Laura Robinson:

at the back of the house.

Laura Robinson:

With views of the sea.

Laura Robinson:

And the other one was the one where the kids got the best bedrooms at

Laura Robinson:

the back of the house with the best light and the views of the sea.

Laura Robinson:

And I think we can probably, everybody knows which one I went for.

Laura Robinson:

The kids are very happy.

Jon Clayton:

Absolutely.

Jon Clayton:

Um, brilliant.

Jon Clayton:

Thanks so much for sharing that.

Jon Clayton:

So let's, let's talk again about the, the concept of first day offers there.

Jon Clayton:

And, and what I'm really interested to dig into is maybe we could do a

Jon Clayton:

little bit of brainstorming and think about the first day off for that.

Jon Clayton:

architectural practices could use.

Jon Clayton:

So to think about, you know, how could we apply something like what you did?

Jon Clayton:

Just to remind everyone, the, the first day offer that you had, it

Jon Clayton:

was how, what was the price point?

Jon Clayton:

Was it 47 pounds?

Laura Robinson:

It's 47 pounds and it's a 20 minute chat.

Laura Robinson:

To solve one particular marketing dilemma.

Laura Robinson:

And so the concept, the overall concept of the first day offer that I, so far,

Laura Robinson:

we've applied it to a lot of different industries, including I figured one out

Laura Robinson:

with a doula the other day, we're doing photographers, um, cake bakers, like

Laura Robinson:

things that you, you just like, I don't know how this would work, but so far I'm

Laura Robinson:

doing okay with figuring out examples.

Laura Robinson:

Um, the concept is that it's a short one to one interaction where.

Laura Robinson:

The they pay for it, and they get something of value the other side of it.

Laura Robinson:

And potentially, they might go on to buy a higher priced offer from you.

Laura Robinson:

And the interaction is a sample of the experience of working with you.

Laura Robinson:

So it does also need to mirror in some way.

Laura Robinson:

Like, if they went to work.

Laura Robinson:

with you longer term, how would you be interacting with them?

Laura Robinson:

Would you be coming to their house?

Laura Robinson:

Would it be via zoom?

Laura Robinson:

Is it a lot over some other platform that you use to communicate with your

Laura Robinson:

clients so that they can really start to see that reality of having you in their

Laura Robinson:

life and what that bigger project might look like, but equally, everyone's happy.

Laura Robinson:

Like if you just do that.

Laura Robinson:

Bite size offer, that first date offer and the client walks away, you're okay

Laura Robinson:

with that because you got paid, you got something from the experience,

Laura Robinson:

they got something of value from the experience and everyone's happy.

Laura Robinson:

It's not where one person's beholden to the other.

Jon Clayton:

Okay.

Jon Clayton:

So, so this is, it's a bite size, one to one offer that leaves both

Jon Clayton:

the customer and you as the service provider, both feeling really happy

Jon Clayton:

about it and enjoying delivering it.

Jon Clayton:

Even if this is something that doesn't, I mean, ideally I could see how this

Jon Clayton:

could easily encourage people to then go on and buy the higher ticket solution,

Jon Clayton:

whatever that package is, but, but it's something that can stand alone.

Jon Clayton:

You can, it can be a standalone product or service as well.

Jon Clayton:

So it's something of value in its own right.

Jon Clayton:

And I thought that was a really good point you made about it mirroring

Jon Clayton:

the way that you work normally.

Jon Clayton:

So maybe if you, uh, let's just say you're a, an architect that does mainly in person

Jon Clayton:

meetings, then it would make sense that maybe there was a short in person element

Jon Clayton:

to this offer, or if you were using.

Jon Clayton:

Video calls like zoom or teams, something like that, that maybe

Jon Clayton:

the first day offer could include that like a little taster session.

Jon Clayton:

So to have it mirror the way that the, the bigger higher ticket

Jon Clayton:

offers work makes a lot of sense.

Laura Robinson:

Because often those are barriers to people working with

Laura Robinson:

you that you don't even realize exist.

Laura Robinson:

Like they might be totally convinced on your expertise and that you're going to

Laura Robinson:

be able to help them and you can get them to this great outcome that they want.

Laura Robinson:

But if they can't picture like, but what's this going to look like in my life?

Laura Robinson:

Like after I've said yes, and I've handed over whatever money or deposit you want.

Laura Robinson:

They just can't imagine what that might be like.

Laura Robinson:

That's a huge barrier to saying yes to it, because nobody wants to jump

Laura Robinson:

across this like invisible bridge and trust that it's there for them.

Laura Robinson:

So if you can do something to help make that bridge more real, they can imagine

Laura Robinson:

what that experience is going to be like.

Laura Robinson:

It breaks down a lot of barriers to them saying yes to working with you more.

Jon Clayton:

Okay.

Jon Clayton:

So, I mean, some initial, I did have a few initial thoughts, and I'd

Jon Clayton:

love to get your feedback on these.

Jon Clayton:

So one idea was maybe sending an initial appraisal of a property or a building plot

Jon Clayton:

or a building's development potential.

Jon Clayton:

So something like that.

Jon Clayton:

Another idea was maybe to, to give feedback on a customer's own.

Jon Clayton:

Sketch design.

Jon Clayton:

Often people will be on Pinterest collating all sorts of ideas and, and

Jon Clayton:

sketching out their own floor plans.

Jon Clayton:

So I wondered about maybe giving feedback on that, on their design idea, maybe

Jon Clayton:

via a short video, perhaps it could be a little video screen recording.

Jon Clayton:

Um, or maybe.

Jon Clayton:

At one thing that a lot of people's minds is particularly homeowners

Jon Clayton:

is whether to move or improve.

Jon Clayton:

They might be thinking, you know, we, we need an extra extra bedroom.

Jon Clayton:

Like what's the best thing to do?

Jon Clayton:

Do we, do we move or improve what we've got?

Jon Clayton:

So it could be a telephone consultation or a Voxer call using

Jon Clayton:

Voxer to help them decide on that.

Jon Clayton:

aNd the other idea I had was.

Jon Clayton:

Helping them maybe figure out the next three steps to, to get started on a

Jon Clayton:

renovation or a property development.

Jon Clayton:

So do you think, I mean, there's four different ideas there.

Jon Clayton:

Do you think any of those would have legs?

Jon Clayton:

I mean, for an architecture business owner,

Jon Clayton:

Remember, don't forget to subscribe to my free weekly email newsletter.

Jon Clayton:

You can do that at mrjonclayton.co.uk/abc.

Jon Clayton:

And if you are enjoying this episode then please visit podchaser.com,

Jon Clayton:

search for Architecture Business Club and leave a five star review.

Jon Clayton:

Now, back to the show.

Laura Robinson:

I think all of those have, um, have legs,

Laura Robinson:

like they've all got potential.

Laura Robinson:

You wouldn't, uh, you wouldn't do them all.

Laura Robinson:

You'd just like pick, pick an idea or come up with your own.

Laura Robinson:

That is, that's the one that you kind of stick to.

Laura Robinson:

And you trot, trot out every now and then when you want to generate some clients.

Laura Robinson:

But what I wanted to say about all those different ideas is, I love that most of

Laura Robinson:

them, probably all of them, were things that you could do in your own time.

Laura Robinson:

So you actually did it, although it's great to have some element of one

Laura Robinson:

to one interaction so they can get to know you, you also don't want to,

Laura Robinson:

um, you know, block out your diary with having to do this all the time.

Laura Robinson:

So if you have to do some one to one elements to it, I I batch mine,

Laura Robinson:

so they're only available for a couple of weeks, every few months

Laura Robinson:

so that I can get them done and then clear out my diary in this space.

Laura Robinson:

Or for some people it's, you don't want to batch it because you know, in your line of

Laura Robinson:

work, there's a very short window of time when someone's wants to hire an architect.

Laura Robinson:

And if your availability doesn't line up with that, then it

Laura Robinson:

causes all sorts of problems.

Laura Robinson:

So you probably will want your first day offers to be available all the time.

Laura Robinson:

In which case the method of delivery needs to be really flexible for you, that it can

Laura Robinson:

fit around your existing work schedule.

Laura Robinson:

where you said, like, record a video feedback of Leflore Pan

Laura Robinson:

and what's possible for them.

Laura Robinson:

You can do that at 8 o'clock at night or 6 o'clock in the morning,

Laura Robinson:

2 o'clock in the afternoon, whatever you've got time for it.

Laura Robinson:

And it doesn't matter what the client's doing, because then it's asynchronous.

Laura Robinson:

They're not having to be present at the same time.

Laura Robinson:

So I love those ideas.

Laura Robinson:

Um, and I also wanted to point out how.

Laura Robinson:

they would attract very different types of client.

Laura Robinson:

And you need to think about, is that someone I want to work with?

Laura Robinson:

Because I'm guessing for some of you, some architects, you absolutely love

Laura Robinson:

the client that's there with their little, this is me with my grid of

Laura Robinson:

paper, drawing it out quite accurately.

Laura Robinson:

I was very proud of myself and going, but what would happen

Laura Robinson:

if we moved this over here?

Laura Robinson:

And is it very expensive to move this wall because it would have this great impact?

Laura Robinson:

Like you might want to.

Laura Robinson:

Really work with someone like that and there'll be other architects listening

Laura Robinson:

going, no, like you, I will charge three times as much if someone's going

Laura Robinson:

to present a piece of graph paper with me with a sketch of the house.

Laura Robinson:

Like, absolutely not.

Laura Robinson:

So

Jon Clayton:

move away from the graph paper.

Laura Robinson:

so you can use your first day offer to position yourself as

Laura Robinson:

I really want to attract these people.

Laura Robinson:

And I definitely.

Laura Robinson:

Don't want to be working with those people.

Laura Robinson:

And so you'll naturally, um, find that the hot, the people that go on to work

Laura Robinson:

with you and your bigger offers, you've almost created your own filter to make

Laura Robinson:

sure that only certain people get through the gate because you've only attracted

Laura Robinson:

the ones you really enjoy working with.

Jon Clayton:

Oh, I love that.

Jon Clayton:

That's brilliant.

Jon Clayton:

So one thing, it encouraged the idea of doing something that's asynchronous.

Jon Clayton:

So that you've got the flexibility to fit it in to suit your own,

Jon Clayton:

your own time, your own calendar.

Jon Clayton:

So something like, um, feedback that's delivered via a video, via

Jon Clayton:

a voxer message, even maybe like a report or something that gets emailed.

Jon Clayton:

It could even just be a simple report of, um, a sketch plan or

Jon Clayton:

something that gets emailed off.

Jon Clayton:

Something along those lines would be far.

Jon Clayton:

Easier to deliver.

Jon Clayton:

And also as well in terms of price point, like there'd be far less

Jon Clayton:

time to do that than to try and arrange a time to go out and visit

Jon Clayton:

somebody in person with travel time.

Jon Clayton:

And, you know, inevitably getting around there and saying, right,

Jon Clayton:

it's a 30 minute consultation.

Jon Clayton:

And then it's like an hour and a quarter later because you can't get away.

Jon Clayton:

And that does happen.

Jon Clayton:

That sounds like we've got some really like solid ideas there that could work

Jon Clayton:

for, for some practice owners, but how the heck do we decide what to charge for it?

Laura Robinson:

I don't know, I wish there was like a magic number I could

Laura Robinson:

go and every first day offer is charged at 97 and everyone like pays the same.

Laura Robinson:

I think it's going to vary massively with your, um, like for the industry.

Laura Robinson:

So you can charge a lot more because eventually the thing that they're

Laura Robinson:

going to buy is even a higher price than, than what I can charge.

Laura Robinson:

So it needs to be a balance between, it's a really easy

Laura Robinson:

thing for people to say yes to.

Laura Robinson:

Like it's not.

Laura Robinson:

They don't have to think about what's a bit of an investment

Laura Robinson:

like this is a bit hard.

Laura Robinson:

Am I saying yes now or do I wait a month?

Laura Robinson:

It does need to be low so that there's very little friction there because

Laura Robinson:

you've got that potential for them to be a lead for a higher paying thing.

Laura Robinson:

But there has to be absolutely no resentment from you.

Laura Robinson:

For delivering it for that fee now for me, I was, it was easy for me to charge

Laura Robinson:

a very small amount compared to what it would be to work with me longer term

Laura Robinson:

because it's not available at the time.

Laura Robinson:

So it's very small batches.

Laura Robinson:

I release a batch of 10.

Laura Robinson:

They go pretty quickly.

Laura Robinson:

So it's done entirely on my own terms.

Laura Robinson:

It's not trading off.

Laura Robinson:

So people who buy my higher price things don't think, oh, yeah, but

Laura Robinson:

if I bought 10 of this low price thing, you know, I would have paid.

Laura Robinson:

It doesn't work like that because you just can't buy lots

Laura Robinson:

of these lower price things.

Laura Robinson:

They're in a very limited number for very limited periods of time.

Laura Robinson:

But I also get so much more out of it than the money.

Laura Robinson:

So when I'm judging, is there any resentment for me only

Laura Robinson:

charging this small fee?

Laura Robinson:

Absolutely not because I get so much from it, not just the leads that it

Laura Robinson:

generates, but from the experience.

Laura Robinson:

Just really being able to understand what's going on in those

Laura Robinson:

potential clients minds, what are they struggling with every day?

Laura Robinson:

What's the thing that's holding them back?

Laura Robinson:

Even if they don't go on to work with me longer term, I'm using that

Laura Robinson:

knowledge to create content, to come up with marketing ideas, to refine

Laura Robinson:

the paid products that people can buy.

Laura Robinson:

When I'm deciding the price, there's so much more when I'm deciding the price,

Laura Robinson:

I'm looking at the value exchange.

Laura Robinson:

What are they getting out of it?

Laura Robinson:

And do I feel good about what I'm getting out of it?

Laura Robinson:

But it's not just money.

Laura Robinson:

There's so much more on like my side of the equation.

Jon Clayton:

Got it.

Jon Clayton:

Got it.

Jon Clayton:

Now that's given me a really good, I'm already thinking now thinking

Jon Clayton:

like, what, what could I do with these ideas and how much would I charge?

Jon Clayton:

But now that's given me a really good kind of yardstick to work to that.

Laura Robinson:

I want to just to like interrupt you, but it's really

Laura Robinson:

important that it's not that this is why it works so much better

Laura Robinson:

than like a one hour consultation.

Laura Robinson:

When you do something that's ambiguous like that, and you're just.

Laura Robinson:

Giving away an hour of your time, people start to do the maths of,

Laura Robinson:

well, if I bought three of these, would you be able to do this?

Laura Robinson:

And it might not be as much of an issue in your profession, but maybe

Laura Robinson:

it is you're trying to create this.

Laura Robinson:

The first day offer is something that's so standalone.

Laura Robinson:

It's not comparable to the higher price things.

Laura Robinson:

It's not a, you couldn't buy 10 of them and make your big thing.

Laura Robinson:

Cause that's just not how it works.

Laura Robinson:

It's something that's, uh, you know, it's an individual

Laura Robinson:

discrete standalone offer that.

Laura Robinson:

They can't, you know, it's not a component of your bigger thing.

Laura Robinson:

You can't make it up by buying lots of those or having, I'll

Laura Robinson:

have one of those a month.

Laura Robinson:

And then I don't need to buy you a long term package.

Laura Robinson:

It just doesn't work like that.

Jon Clayton:

Okay.

Jon Clayton:

So rather than it, rather than it being framed like you're buying.

Jon Clayton:

30 minutes of my time.

Jon Clayton:

It's like you're getting this transformation.

Jon Clayton:

This is the thing you buy this thing.

Jon Clayton:

We solve this problem and at the end, once you've received it, your life

Jon Clayton:

is so many times better because we've fixed this thing is struggling with.

Jon Clayton:

It's not about the fact that it might only take you 30 minutes to actually do it.

Laura Robinson:

Exactly.

Laura Robinson:

And the example in, in the course that I've got about it, the example I use

Laura Robinson:

is, if you had a gardener come and knock on your door, like a gardener can

Laura Robinson:

see that the garden's a bit of a tip.

Laura Robinson:

You obviously need some help with that.

Laura Robinson:

They could knock on your door and say, you can hire me for

Laura Robinson:

this much money every week.

Laura Robinson:

That's quite a hard thing to say, yes, you're like, I don't know who you are

Laura Robinson:

and I don't know what you're going to do.

Laura Robinson:

And I don't really want to commit to that, or they could say, you

Laura Robinson:

can hire me for an hour and see what I can achieve in an hour.

Laura Robinson:

And you might say yes, but again, it doesn't really like give you this feeling

Laura Robinson:

of what it's going to be like to have someone for long term, or they could offer

Laura Robinson:

you a package that takes them an hour to deliver, but we don't need to know that.

Laura Robinson:

And they come in and they describe, this is what I would do to your

Laura Robinson:

garden to make it somewhere that would be really enjoyable for you.

Laura Robinson:

And this is what that would look like.

Laura Robinson:

And you pay for it because.

Laura Robinson:

You could go away and implement that plan yourself if you wanted, but for the

Laura Robinson:

most part, you're going to say, yeah, no, that's way too much work for me to do.

Laura Robinson:

So yes, if you'd like to come back every week for this amount of money and work

Laura Robinson:

towards this vision of my garden that you've created, that would be wonderful.

Jon Clayton:

Okay, that, that makes a lot of sense.

Jon Clayton:

Are there any, are there any pitfalls that you've come across or your

Jon Clayton:

other clients that have developed their own first night offers?

Jon Clayton:

Is there any, any pitfalls to avoid or any, any problems that you've

Jon Clayton:

found that people have had to kind of work around in creating these offers?

Laura Robinson:

Being too big in scope.

Laura Robinson:

It's 20 minutes, people are going to work with me for 20 minutes.

Laura Robinson:

We're going to tackle one project or one.

Laura Robinson:

Question one dilemma, one problem that's very narrow.

Laura Robinson:

As soon as I've worked with people who have then said, Oh, but you know, I

Laura Robinson:

don't mind it being an hour or like, I'm happy to offer my clients longer.

Laura Robinson:

And then they find that everyone leaves unhappy.

Laura Robinson:

Cause you sort of start pulling other threads and asking other questions

Laura Robinson:

and looking in other places, but you can't ever really make that

Laura Robinson:

much progress in those things and wrap it up in a way that feels.

Laura Robinson:

Comfortable and like, everybody's happy and you've, you know, tie a

Laura Robinson:

nice bow around it and that's done.

Laura Robinson:

So I think making it too broad in scope actually ends up with

Laura Robinson:

everyone feeling a bit dissatisfied.

Laura Robinson:

Um, not having, I mean, this is definitely a mistake I make.

Laura Robinson:

I do not have good enough follow up processes.

Laura Robinson:

So I, I love doing them, but I find them quite energetically draining.

Laura Robinson:

And so then when it's done.

Laura Robinson:

In my head, I'm like, I must follow up with this person and say, if we

Laura Robinson:

were to work together longer term, we would work on this, this and this.

Laura Robinson:

And here's how you do that.

Laura Robinson:

Or here's how you find out more about that.

Laura Robinson:

And that will sit on my to do list for about three days.

Laura Robinson:

And then I feel really embarrassed.

Laura Robinson:

Like, Oh, I have to go back to them now and say, do you remember

Laura Robinson:

that conversation we just had?

Laura Robinson:

So I'm getting better at doing it straight away afterwards, but, um,

Laura Robinson:

really I should leave more time in my diary to recover and then batch.

Laura Robinson:

The replies and get back to people.

Laura Robinson:

But yeah, that's my own personal bit that I fall down with.

Laura Robinson:

And also having them like it, you do need to have some restriction on

Laura Robinson:

the availability just because when something's available all the time

Laura Robinson:

and it's a low price, it's people just don't, they're like, Oh yeah,

Laura Robinson:

but maybe I'll buy it next week.

Laura Robinson:

Maybe I'll buy it next week.

Laura Robinson:

Like, unless they have some internal urgency for why they need to get it.

Laura Robinson:

They'll always defer the decision and, um, it doesn't mean that you.

Laura Robinson:

You know, I sell lots of my things like evergreen where you can buy it

Laura Robinson:

anytime, but for this 1 thing you want it to have to be such an easy.

Laura Robinson:

Yes.

Laura Robinson:

And have such momentum to it.

Laura Robinson:

Ideally, there is some degree of, um, limits to the availability

Laura Robinson:

or when, uh, the timing of it.

Jon Clayton:

Okay, so, so to try and find a way of creating some scarcity,

Jon Clayton:

uh, so that there's some urgency for the customers to, to book it in.

Laura Robinson:

And there will be, because you don't want to do

Laura Robinson:

endless numbers of these every week.

Laura Robinson:

So you're going to just invent your own scarcity.

Laura Robinson:

To

Jon Clayton:

That's been absolutely brilliant, Nora.

Jon Clayton:

Do you want to try and sum it up?

Jon Clayton:

What would you say are the three main things that you want

Jon Clayton:

people to take away from this conversation about first day offers?

Jon Clayton:

Do you want to try and sum things up for us?

Jon Clayton:

I love

Laura Robinson:

be honest, the one main thing is, think really creatively

Laura Robinson:

about how you make it easy for people to say yes to work with you.

Laura Robinson:

Because just, The, you'll have seen in your industry

Laura Robinson:

the same as in every industry.

Laura Robinson:

There's a default way that people do things and that's how we do it.

Laura Robinson:

And that's how we charge and that's how we structure offers

Laura Robinson:

and that's what everyone expects.

Laura Robinson:

And it like, there's literally no reason why it has to be that way.

Laura Robinson:

And if there's a way that works better for you, there will be a subset of clients

Laura Robinson:

that look at your way of doing it and go.

Laura Robinson:

Oh, that is, that's perfect.

Laura Robinson:

That's exactly what I want.

Laura Robinson:

I chose the, you know, the primary driver for me choosing my architect

Laura Robinson:

is that I didn't really have to have anything to do with it.

Laura Robinson:

She was lovely, but I didn't have to be around and fill the appointments and I

Laura Robinson:

could just leave her in the builder and they would sort it out between them.

Laura Robinson:

Other people don't want that.

Laura Robinson:

Other people want to be really hands on and know I'm your direct point of contact.

Laura Robinson:

And so you get to choose who are the people I most want to work with.

Laura Robinson:

Okay.

Laura Robinson:

Well, I will set up a first date offer that really appeals

Laura Robinson:

to that group of people.

Laura Robinson:

And then your business is going to be shaped to the other side of that, that

Laura Robinson:

you're only going to be working with people that you love to work with.

Laura Robinson:

So I see it as a really.

Laura Robinson:

A great opportunity to be very creative in the way that you package what

Laura Robinson:

you do and how you sort of target the people you want to work with.

Laura Robinson:

And it's very low risk because if you try it, so if we go back to our example of I

Laura Robinson:

love working with people who have graph paper and they draw their house and you

Laura Robinson:

create an offer that's based around that and you try it out and it doesn't work

Laura Robinson:

or you try it out and those people go on to be clients and you have a couple

Laura Robinson:

of nightmare projects and you think.

Laura Robinson:

I'm never doing that again.

Laura Robinson:

You just take away the first day offer or create another one.

Laura Robinson:

You haven't completely rebranded your business or made massive

Laura Robinson:

changes that you can't go back on.

Laura Robinson:

You've just run a little experiment that made a bit of

Laura Robinson:

money and learn something from it.

Jon Clayton:

that.

Jon Clayton:

It sounds like a fantastic way to, to differentiate yourself

Jon Clayton:

from the norm from particularly for architecture practice owners.

Jon Clayton:

And there are this, you know, quite a few kinds of common ways that

Jon Clayton:

conventions that people, the way that they work normally, there's a lot of

Jon Clayton:

similarities from practice to practice.

Jon Clayton:

So actually having something like this, creating a first date offer.

Jon Clayton:

Would be a really cool way for them to differentiate

Jon Clayton:

themselves in their marketplace.

Jon Clayton:

So, um, hugely valuable.

Jon Clayton:

So thanks so much for sharing about this, Laura.

Jon Clayton:

Was there anything else you wanted to add that we haven't covered?

Laura Robinson:

I think so.

Laura Robinson:

I think, I mean, just my mantra is it has to be comfortable

Laura Robinson:

and enjoyable for you to do it.

Laura Robinson:

So whatever your first date offer looks like, if it's fun for you to deliver

Laura Robinson:

it, that's a really good place to start.

Laura Robinson:

Don't do something, don't do it because we've said it's a good idea to do it.

Laura Robinson:

Like if you, if you listen to this and think, well, no, I don't, I don't want

Laura Robinson:

to have that blocking up my calendar.

Laura Robinson:

That sounds like a nightmare.

Laura Robinson:

Like it's not the thing that you, it's not the new in thing

Laura Robinson:

that you absolutely must do.

Laura Robinson:

It's just something to try out if it feels fun and comfortable for you to do it.

Jon Clayton:

Cool.

Jon Clayton:

Brilliant.

Jon Clayton:

There's one other question that I wanted to ask and it's nothing

Jon Clayton:

to do with First State Offers.

Jon Clayton:

I love travel and discovering new places and I just wanted to tell you to tell me

Jon Clayton:

one of your favorite places and what you love about it and it can be near or far.

Jon Clayton:

Got a feeling I might know what you're gonna say, but fire away

Laura Robinson:

Is it that, you know, I'm just going to say my local beach.

Laura Robinson:

Is that what you're expecting?

Laura Robinson:

So I

Jon Clayton:

if that's fine

Laura Robinson:

I live one mile from the coast, which is lovely.

Laura Robinson:

I can see the sea from the back of our house where our new extension is.

Laura Robinson:

And, um, I just, I love being there.

Laura Robinson:

I love.

Laura Robinson:

I love walking by the sea and the sound that the waves make, but I also love

Laura Robinson:

the fact that some days it's still and calm, like a pond and other days it's

Laura Robinson:

so fierce and cold and unappealing and you wouldn't ever imagine going in it.

Laura Robinson:

And it's just still the same sea.

Laura Robinson:

I feel like that that's such, um, for me, it feels like such a metaphor for life.

Laura Robinson:

Like I'm in the same place, but it's such a different experience

Laura Robinson:

each time you go down there.

Laura Robinson:

So, yeah, that's my favorite place.

Laura Robinson:

And it's a very lovely beach to come and visit as well.

Jon Clayton:

I'll have to visit one day.

Jon Clayton:

I Love the I love the coast.

Jon Clayton:

I used to live by the coast and we now live about a 45 minute drive

Jon Clayton:

away and I, I didn't appreciate how much I loved living by the coast

Jon Clayton:

until not living by the coast.

Jon Clayton:

And now whenever we go back, I just absolutely love it

Jon Clayton:

for all those same reasons.

Jon Clayton:

It's lovely.

Jon Clayton:

Plus it usually involves like fish and chips and ice cream as well.

Jon Clayton:

So that's obviously a bonus.

Jon Clayton:

Um, so Laura, thanks so much for coming on the show.

Jon Clayton:

Really appreciate you coming on and sharing your expertise.

Jon Clayton:

Where can people go online to find out more about you?

Laura Robinson:

So my website is worditude.

Laura Robinson:

co.

Laura Robinson:

uk, um, that's, and on Facebook, if you just put forward slash

Laura Robinson:

worditude, you'll find me.

Laura Robinson:

I couldn't use my real name because there are so many Laura Robinsons

Laura Robinson:

working online that I would never have been able to differentiate myself.

Laura Robinson:

So I made up a word and I used that instead.

Jon Clayton:

Okay.

Jon Clayton:

And you want to remind everyone how to sign up for your

Jon Clayton:

comfy business newsletter.

Laura Robinson:

So that's at worditude.

Laura Robinson:

co.

Laura Robinson:

uk forward slash newsletter.

Laura Robinson:

And I send two emails out, usually two emails out every week.

Laura Robinson:

Uh, one on a Tuesday is much more story based about my very

Laura Robinson:

comfortable business and life.

Laura Robinson:

And hopefully there's some things in there that you can

Laura Robinson:

learn or just enjoy reading it.

Laura Robinson:

And then on Thursdays, I send the Comfy Business Link Buffet, which is just a

Laura Robinson:

bunch of stuff that either I've created, or I found, or other people have created.

Laura Robinson:

Um, That might be useful or helpful when you're running your business.

Jon Clayton:

Oh, that's awesome.

Jon Clayton:

Thanks so much, Laura.

Laura Robinson:

You're welcome.

Laura Robinson:

Thank you.

Jon Clayton:

Next time, I'll be chatting with architects and architectural

Jon Clayton:

technologist and Vanna about her experience of returning to practice.

Jon Clayton:

Thanks so much for listening to this episode of Architecture Business Club.

Jon Clayton:

If you liked this episode, think other people might enjoy it.

Jon Clayton:

Or just want to show your support, then please visit podchaser.com.

Jon Clayton:

Search for Architecture Business Club and leave a glowing five-star review.

Jon Clayton:

It would mean so much to me and makes it easier for new

Jon Clayton:

listeners to discover the show.

Jon Clayton:

If you just want to connect with me, you can do that on most social media

Jon Clayton:

platforms, just search for @mrjonclayton.

Jon Clayton:

The best place to connect with me online though is on LinkedIn.

Jon Clayton:

You can find a link to my profile in the show notes.

Jon Clayton:

Remember running your architecture business doesn't have to be hard.

Jon Clayton:

And you don't need to do it alone.

Jon Clayton:

This is Architecture Business Club.

Show artwork for Architecture Business Club - For Architects, Architectural Technologists, Surveyors & Designers

About the Podcast

Architecture Business Club - For Architects, Architectural Technologists, Surveyors & Designers
Helping busy architecture professionals build a better business with actionable tips and tactics.
Architecture Business Club is the weekly podcast to help solo and small firm architecture business owners build a profitable, future-proof architecture practice that both you and your clients love! It’s an inclusive place (for ALL architecture business owners). So whether you’re an Architect, Architectural Technologist, or Architectural Designer…If you sell architectural services and want to improve the way you do things…This is THE podcast for you.

I’m Jon Clayton, your show host, and a Chartered Architectural Technologist based in the UK. I’ve been in architecture for over two decades and running my own (solo) practice for 10 years+.

Each week you’ll hear from inspiring people from the world of architecture and business who share actionable tips to help you improve how you work, save time, or make more money. I’ll also share my own experiences running an architecture business in occasional solo episodes. We cover everything from mindset, money, business strategy, sales & marketing, productivity, systems & workflows, client experience, outsourcing, software, technology, and much more.

Episodes are kept as short as possible by cutting out the fluff and getting straight to the point. So expect interview episodes of around 30 minutes or less, and solo episodes of 5 to 15 minutes.

New episodes are released every Thursday at 6am GMT / 2am EST.

Welcome to the Club!

About your host

Profile picture for Jon Clayton

Jon Clayton

I’m Jon. A Chartered Architectural Technologist and the founder of Architecture Business Club. I've been working in architecture for over two decades and running my own architectural design business for over ten of those years. My mission is to help you build a better architecture business on your terms. So if you're a sole practitioner (or small practice) architect, architectural technologist, or architectural designer, I want to help YOU. I'm a Northerner but now live with my family in Norfolk, UK. Outside of work, I'm a guitar tottin', kayaking, movie trivia buff.