Episode 3

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Published on:

16th Nov 2023

Business Coaching: Transforming Your Architecture Practice With Kris Baxter | 003

In this episode of the Architecture Business Club podcast, Jon discusses with Kris Baxter the role of business coaching in transforming architectural practices. Kris, a Chartered Architectural Technologist and founder of Studio 11 Architecture, shares his own experiences with business coaching. He recounts how coaching focused on his personal development, which reflected positively on his business. Looking within, Kris changed the direction of his firm to align it with his personal goals, aspirations, and happiness rather than just creating another job. Their discussion highlights the significance of self-awareness, adaptability in dealing with people, and setting personal end goals for successful business ownership and positive transformation.

Today's Guest...

Kris is a Chartered Architectural Technologist and the founder of Studio 11 Architecture. A collective of creative designers that produce distinctive, functional architecture across the UK. The team specialise in bespoke home design, has won a string of awards, and had their work featured on the UK's most popular property design show.

Episode Highlights...

00:00 Introduction to the Podcast

00:44 Introduction to Guest Kris Baxter

01:17 Personal Interests and Hobbies

01:50 Understanding Business Coaching

02:17 Kris's Business Before Coaching

05:42 The Impact of Coaching on Kris's Personal Life

05:57 Misconceptions about Business Coaching

07:54 First Coaching Session Experience

15:27 Impact of Coaching on the Architecture Business

21:02 Advice for Those Considering Coaching

25:15 Podcast Wrap-up and Contact Information

Key Takeaways...

👉Business coaching can have a profound impact on both the personal and professional aspects of a business owner's life.

👉Owning a business should align with your end goals and aspirations, otherwise, it can feel like just going to work.

👉Self-reflection and self-awareness are important in understanding one's behavior and how it affects day-to-day interactions with staff and clients.

👉Effective communication and adaptability are crucial skills for success in business.

👉Finding a coach who works well with you and understands the specific needs of your business is essential.

👉Having clear end goals for your business allows you to make strategic decisions and navigate challenges.

👉Being open-minded, seeking advice from others, and learning from different sources can lead to new insights and opportunities.

👉Building a team that enjoys their work and aligns with the goals of the business can contribute to its success.

👉Don't compare yourself to other architectural practices, focus on what you do well and stick with it.

👉Taking time for self-reflection and resetting can help in planning for the future and maintaining a healthy work-life balance.

Links Mentioned In The Episode...

Learn More About Studio 11 Architecture…

https://www.studio11architecture.co.uk/

Email Kris at…

kris.baxter@studio11architecture.co.uk

What To Do Next...

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@mrjonclayton

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https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCGZOAac4salmSX0wWRT7JUg

📐Visit Jon’s website here.

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In The Next Episode...

Next time, Jon talks about side hustle architectural services and shares a bit about how and why he started his own side hustle.

Transcript
Jon Clayton:

Business coaching transform your architecture practice.

Jon Clayton:

That's exactly what we are going to be discussing in this episode

Jon Clayton:

of architecture business club, the weekly podcast for solo and small firm

Jon Clayton:

architecture, practice owners, just like you who want to build a profitable

Jon Clayton:

future proof architecture business.

Jon Clayton:

That fits around their life.

Jon Clayton:

I'm the host, Jon Clayton.

Jon Clayton:

If you want to get notified.

Jon Clayton:

When I release a new episode and get access to free resources and exclusive

Jon Clayton:

offers, they go to mrjonclayton.co.uk/abc.

Jon Clayton:

And sign up to my free weekly email newsletter.

Jon Clayton:

Now let's discuss business coaching with Kris Baxter.

Jon Clayton:

Kris is a chartered architectural technologist and the founder

Jon Clayton:

of Studio 11 Architecture, a collective of creative designers

Jon Clayton:

that produce distinctive functional architecture right across the UK.

Jon Clayton:

The team specialize in bespoke home design, has won a string of awards and

Jon Clayton:

had their work featured on the UK's most popular property TV design show.

Jon Clayton:

Visit studio11architecture.

Jon Clayton:

co.

Jon Clayton:

uk.

Jon Clayton:

to connect with Kris and the team.

Jon Clayton:

Kris, thanks for joining me today.

Jon Clayton:

Before we dive into things, I know you're a big Formula One fan and I just

Jon Clayton:

wanted to ask how has this Formula One season compared to previous ones for you?

Kris Baxter:

Well, I'm a massive McLaren fan, so from my

Kris Baxter:

point of view, it's fantastic.

Kris Baxter:

Lando and, um, Oscar are right up there.

Jon Clayton:

Have you, uh, have you ever been to watch the Formula One?

Kris Baxter:

Yeah, we went, um, used to go with my brother quite regularly.

Kris Baxter:

Um, I actually have splashed out this year again for tickets

Kris Baxter:

next year, uh, Silverstone.

Kris Baxter:

I think Monza's on my list.

Jon Clayton:

Kris, so we were going to talk about today, um, not just Formula

Jon Clayton:

One, we were going to talk about business coaching and you've had some experience of

Jon Clayton:

business coaching and being coached, but business coaching is something that most

Jon Clayton:

business owners have at least heard of, but many may not understand much about it.

Jon Clayton:

So we're going to talk about your experience of being coached and

Jon Clayton:

how coaching can transform an architectural design business.

Jon Clayton:

So firstly, Kris, I want you to ask really what, what business was like,

Jon Clayton:

um, before investing in coaching.

Kris Baxter:

So, I started the practice back in 2008 and I started by myself in

Kris Baxter:

my spare room, probably like most, um, most guys that start their own practice.

Kris Baxter:

I got to a point where I needed to make a decision.

Kris Baxter:

I was getting so much work in that I either needed to start to turn stuff away

Kris Baxter:

or I needed to take the step forward and set an office up and things like that.

Kris Baxter:

And, um, I took the view that I was young enough to do that and

Kris Baxter:

I had the ability to do that.

Kris Baxter:

I wasn't, I didn't have a family at the time.

Kris Baxter:

Um, so I could take the risk.

Kris Baxter:

Uh, and I took that risk and took that leap, but it kind of

Kris Baxter:

snowballed very quickly after that.

Kris Baxter:

And we got to a point where we were probably an office of 12.

Kris Baxter:

I was completely separate from the projects.

Kris Baxter:

So I ended up managing the team and managing clients, but I

Kris Baxter:

didn't really do any of the stuff that we kind of trained to do.

Kris Baxter:

Um, and the bit of the job that where we probably all most enjoy, which is the

Kris Baxter:

hands on stuff of drawing and designing and all of those sorts of things.

Kris Baxter:

Um, and I started to get to a point where I was thinking.

Kris Baxter:

Is this what I want to do?

Kris Baxter:

It's quite stressful because, you know, the numbers at the end

Kris Baxter:

of a month to, to, um, make sure payroll is delivered and overheads

Kris Baxter:

are covered and things like that.

Kris Baxter:

Quite high.

Kris Baxter:

Um, and I wasn't getting the day to day enjoyment of, you know, putting

Kris Baxter:

life aside and being able to, um, Just sit down and come up with a

Kris Baxter:

concept and draw something in essence.

Kris Baxter:

Um, so ironically, we never really looked at business coaching.

Kris Baxter:

Um, we were chugging along and, um, my wife had joined the practice

Kris Baxter:

by that time, um, to help me out.

Kris Baxter:

And, uh, we had an HR company that helped us out on little HR things.

Kris Baxter:

Um, I have this thing where...

Kris Baxter:

If I don't know about something, I won't go anywhere near it myself.

Kris Baxter:

So I, I make a point of employing the right people to do that.

Kris Baxter:

So at a very early stage, we got this HR company into to help us

Kris Baxter:

sort contracts and things like that.

Kris Baxter:

And they were a husband and wife team.

Kris Baxter:

And, um, We went to one of their seminars and sat through three quarters

Kris Baxter:

of the seminar and, um, they work very, very well together as a team.

Kris Baxter:

Uh, and we ended up having a conversation with them at the end of them, whereby,

Kris Baxter:

um, the husband had said to me, you know, I'm looking to do some bits outside of HR.

Kris Baxter:

Um, does any of that as a business owner sort of, um, fit in with you?

Kris Baxter:

And, you know, could we help you out kind of thing?

Kris Baxter:

And we said, Oh, actually, yeah, some of some of the things would be

Kris Baxter:

and they were more holistic things.

Kris Baxter:

They were not, um, kind of the usual business coach kind of approach, uh,

Kris Baxter:

which for me was a little bit more, um, resonating because I know profit and loss.

Kris Baxter:

I know how to run a basic business.

Kris Baxter:

Um, what it turns out I didn't know at the time is I didn't know myself that well.

Kris Baxter:

And that was the thing, really, that.

Kris Baxter:

that started to help me to move the business forward.

Jon Clayton:

So what, what did you know about coaching before

Jon Clayton:

you actually invested in it?

Kris Baxter:

The only, the only coaching I knew about was the people

Kris Baxter:

that dropped in on LinkedIn and said, would you like to triple your turnover

Kris Baxter:

or triple your profits in nine months?

Kris Baxter:

Well, and I'm, I'm a skeptical person naturally.

Kris Baxter:

And I was, yeah, what, right, whatever kind of thing, but also.

Kris Baxter:

Architecture is a very, very specific type of business and there's some

Kris Baxter:

really basic rules you can do in business, but they don't always

Kris Baxter:

apply to an architecture business.

Kris Baxter:

And I never came across anybody who, who had sort of successfully run

Kris Baxter:

an architecture business and was coaching because that's, that's where

Kris Baxter:

we all look for, for the guidance.

Kris Baxter:

And I still haven't come across one of those people, I don't think.

Kris Baxter:

Um, I think.

Kris Baxter:

To some degree, it's so niche that the people that are running it

Kris Baxter:

actually who are doing a good job are peddling away doing a good job.

Kris Baxter:

They're not, um, they're not running a sideline of a coaching business or they've

Kris Baxter:

not stepped away from architecture.

Kris Baxter:

They're still loving architecture and still doing architecture.

Jon Clayton:

I've got it.

Jon Clayton:

So the, um, the types of, I guess, like the bro marketers that you would see

Jon Clayton:

popping up on LinkedIn, um, and those business coaching promising the dream.

Jon Clayton:

Um, that wasn't something that really resonated with you.

Kris Baxter:

No, not at all.

Jon Clayton:

I think that's the true for a lot of people as well.

Jon Clayton:

I think actually that for many people, there are some sort of negative

Jon Clayton:

connotations when they don't really know much about business coaching and what

Jon Clayton:

they do see of it doesn't inspire them to go ahead and invest in it because they

Jon Clayton:

don't, it doesn't resonate with them.

Jon Clayton:

And the approach that a lot of the coaches and marketers take

Jon Clayton:

isn't relatable for a lot people.

Jon Clayton:

Um, so Kris, could you tell me a little bit about then...about

Jon Clayton:

your first coaching session.

Jon Clayton:

So you'd found this person to work with.

Jon Clayton:

They were taking a holistic approach to things.

Jon Clayton:

Can you tell me about when you first started working with them?

Jon Clayton:

What that first session was like?

Kris Baxter:

We took a deliberate...

Kris Baxter:

Approach to be away from the business.

Kris Baxter:

So we set aside a day, uh, we went and, um, literally hired a meeting

Kris Baxter:

room in a local hotel, had tea, coffee, lunch, that sort of thing.

Kris Baxter:

And we just chatted and we chatted about certain things, but everything that

Kris Baxter:

we chatted about related really to us and not necessarily to the business.

Kris Baxter:

And I think.

Kris Baxter:

One of the, the big things that I had missed the point of was that to own a

Kris Baxter:

business, it has to work for you and it has to work to achieve your end goals.

Kris Baxter:

Otherwise, you're just going to work.

Kris Baxter:

And it suddenly dawned on me that I was just going to work.

Kris Baxter:

I wasn't really creating a business that delivered.

Kris Baxter:

where my aspirations were.

Kris Baxter:

And to some degree, that's kind of, cause at that time, I didn't quite

Kris Baxter:

know what my aspirations were and what I wanted to do with my personal life,

Kris Baxter:

my family life and things change.

Kris Baxter:

Uh, and Suddenly, I'd kind of gone from, my wife had joined the business

Kris Baxter:

to, to having a family and my family's grown there and my priorities from

Kris Baxter:

being a single guy running a business to being a family man and running

Kris Baxter:

a business are entirely different.

Kris Baxter:

And from my point of view, I started to then look at myself

Kris Baxter:

internally a little bit more about my personality and how that affected.

Kris Baxter:

day to day interaction with staff, how that affected clients.

Kris Baxter:

And we did a whole load of analysis with the team and started to bring the

Kris Baxter:

team into doing certain things around understanding their personality types

Kris Baxter:

and all of this is stuff that kind of is nothing new but it's, it's stuff

Kris Baxter:

that's kind of important to begin to understand yourself a little bit more.

Kris Baxter:

And...

Kris Baxter:

On that first day, uh, well, uh, I've never shared this with anybody outside

Kris Baxter:

of that room, but I'm happy to share it with you now being several years later is

Kris Baxter:

that I cried in that session and I cried because I suddenly realized that I don't

Kris Baxter:

have my parents with me and my dad died when I was quite young and one of the big

Kris Baxter:

drivers for me And my ambition and being the best and trying to be the best all the

Kris Baxter:

time without having an end goal actually was to get the approval of my parents

Kris Baxter:

because I wanted them to be proud of me and It took a it took him a fair while to

Kris Baxter:

get that from me he knew what the answer was I didn't know what the answer was when

Kris Baxter:

we were just discussing things and things like that and Yeah, I sat there and cried

Kris Baxter:

Because I suddenly realized something that was so simple and so in my face.

Kris Baxter:

But yeah, I couldn't see it at the time.

Jon Clayton:

Wow.

Jon Clayton:

Kris, thanks so much for sharing that.

Jon Clayton:

Um, I mean, it sounds like that session had a profound impact on you

Jon Clayton:

personally, not just the impact that it had on the business, um, and something

Jon Clayton:

that you, you touched upon there.

Jon Clayton:

Um, this idea that.

Jon Clayton:

When you're working in your business and, and you can get, um, blinkered.

Jon Clayton:

And often we don't take the time for that self reflection to actually kind

Jon Clayton:

of think about why you're doing it.

Jon Clayton:

Why did you start the business in the first place?

Jon Clayton:

And where are you heading with it?

Jon Clayton:

Why are you doing it?

Jon Clayton:

Why aren't you just working at another practice?

Jon Clayton:

And I think often that's something that happens when we start off

Jon Clayton:

maybe with this idea and dream of, of maybe being a business owner

Jon Clayton:

or creating something special.

Jon Clayton:

And then often we end up just creating ourselves another job.

Kris Baxter:

Yeah, exactly that.

Jon Clayton:

Yeah.

Jon Clayton:

Brilliant.

Jon Clayton:

So, um, again, from what you said that I think I was going to ask about

Jon Clayton:

if there's any things that surprised you about being coached, is there any

Jon Clayton:

other things that, that surprised you about the experience of being coached?

Jon Clayton:

Remember, don't forget to subscribe to my free weekly email newsletter.

Jon Clayton:

You can do that at mrjonclayton.co.uk/abc.

Jon Clayton:

And if you are enjoying this episode then please visit podchaser.com,

Jon Clayton:

search for Architecture Business Club and leave a five star review.

Jon Clayton:

Now, back to the show.

Kris Baxter:

I think the surprise for me was how it affected me on a personal level

Kris Baxter:

almost more than on a business level.

Kris Baxter:

Um, it...

Kris Baxter:

It made me look at how I, I am as a person, how I behave, how I can modify

Kris Baxter:

that behavior because I'm aware of it now to achieve things that probably would have

Kris Baxter:

gone by the wayside if I hadn't have took a step back and went, okay, well, if I

Kris Baxter:

approach this in a slightly different way.

Kris Baxter:

Am I actually going to get a better result?

Kris Baxter:

And it's the old analogy of, of losing the battle to win the war.

Kris Baxter:

That's life, isn't it?

Kris Baxter:

It's, um, it's something I think you probably, as a parent, you learn when you

Kris Baxter:

have kids very quickly, the, the games you play with kids to, to get what you want.

Kris Baxter:

Well, that applies to life in general for everybody.

Kris Baxter:

We're all big kids, small kids, uh, business kids.

Kris Baxter:

Trainer kids, all of those different types of people and you can

Kris Baxter:

approach things in such different ways and being adaptable as well.

Kris Baxter:

Um, because the one thing I've always been really proud of is I'm really

Kris Baxter:

adaptable in how I deal with people.

Kris Baxter:

And in being adaptable, you can almost talk to people

Kris Baxter:

individually at their level.

Kris Baxter:

And what In terms of what they're seeking out of a relationship, because

Kris Baxter:

everybody's seeking something out of a relationship, whether it be a

Kris Baxter:

personal relationship, a business relationship, that's again, part of life.

Kris Baxter:

And if you can step back and know and understand that a little bit

Kris Baxter:

more, that can only help you.

Kris Baxter:

And, um, you know, communication with people is always the key.

Kris Baxter:

There's, you know, it's not a surprise that people who are, um, Very,

Kris Baxter:

sort of, good at communicating, are generally quite successful people.

Kris Baxter:

And it's not a surprise that there's some people out in the world that,

Kris Baxter:

you know, are not particularly good academically, but they can communicate

Kris Baxter:

well, they can work with people well, they can be very successful people.

Jon Clayton:

I think that's commonly known as the gift of the gab.

Kris Baxter:

I think it is, yes.

Kris Baxter:

Classic Del Boy, isn't it?

Jon Clayton:

Absolutely.

Jon Clayton:

Yeah.

Jon Clayton:

Um, so, so.

Jon Clayton:

I can see the experience of being coached.

Jon Clayton:

It's had a profound impact on you personally.

Jon Clayton:

How did that translate to, um, once you'd had that experience, how did

Jon Clayton:

that translate to the impact on your architecture business moving forward?

Jon Clayton:

So what happened after you'd started doing the coaching and you'd had

Jon Clayton:

that moment of self realization and self awareness about all these things

Jon Clayton:

that you had going on personally and how you could adapt things there.

Jon Clayton:

How did it impact the architecture business itself?

Kris Baxter:

So we made this, the decision that actually the direction that the

Kris Baxter:

business was going was probably not the direction that we wanted it to go and

Kris Baxter:

it didn't really achieve our end goals.

Kris Baxter:

And, um, one of the things that the coach said to us is to have, have

Kris Baxter:

an end goal, but it doesn't matter that the goal is a moving target.

Kris Baxter:

You can, you know, it doesn't necessarily have to be a straight line.

Kris Baxter:

You can take off from here and go all the way around the houses and come

Kris Baxter:

back and still get back to there.

Kris Baxter:

But have that end goal as to what you want as a business owner

Kris Baxter:

and what you want as a person.

Kris Baxter:

So we took the view that we would change, effectively, the work that we did.

Kris Baxter:

We were doing, I would say, 85 90 percent residential development, mass housing.

Kris Baxter:

Um, Big numbers, but small profit margins.

Kris Baxter:

And certainly from a team point of view, we were struggling to retain

Kris Baxter:

staff because they were getting bored.

Kris Baxter:

The good members of staff were saying, okay, well, we want, we want

Kris Baxter:

to be, um, pushed a little bit more.

Kris Baxter:

We want to do something a little bit different.

Kris Baxter:

And I certainly, from my point of view, is sitting there thinking, I quite fancy,

Kris Baxter:

you know, designing some buildings again.

Kris Baxter:

That would be quite nice because that's kind of what we do.

Kris Baxter:

Um, So we took the view that we were going to slowly start to reorientate

Kris Baxter:

our market of where we were going to go and we obviously had had a few

Kris Baxter:

projects relatively locally that were Self built one off houses and we were

Kris Baxter:

lucky enough to be, um, featured on a TV show with national coverage of a,

Kris Baxter:

um, sort of a modern, modern house.

Kris Baxter:

And everybody in the office loved working on those projects, including me.

Kris Baxter:

So it seemed a no brainer for us to, to try and move to the business to,

Kris Baxter:

to take more of that into account.

Kris Baxter:

Um, And we, we thought it would be a slow process.

Kris Baxter:

And we thought, you know, if we get it to, you know, 60, 40, that'd be great.

Kris Baxter:

But in reality, what happened was lots of how things happened

Kris Baxter:

outside of our control.

Kris Baxter:

So we went through a pandemic that had a big effect on cashflow and how we dealt

Kris Baxter:

with staff levels and things like that.

Kris Baxter:

But ultimately what's happened is the.

Kris Baxter:

The ratios flip the other way.

Kris Baxter:

So we predominantly now do bespoke one off houses.

Kris Baxter:

We do limited amounts of residential development for old clients, um, very

Kris Baxter:

select clients that we like to work with.

Kris Baxter:

Um, but what has happened is the turnover has pretty much stayed the same.

Kris Baxter:

The overhead is almost reduced by half.

Kris Baxter:

So...

Kris Baxter:

Overall, in terms of profit, then there's, there's much more

Kris Baxter:

significant profit to be made there.

Kris Baxter:

And I've got a team that are enjoying the work that they're doing.

Kris Baxter:

They're not churning out things.

Kris Baxter:

They're working through things, designing solutions to things,

Kris Baxter:

engineering solutions to things.

Kris Baxter:

Um, and we're now in a position where we're thinking, okay, well.

Kris Baxter:

Beginning to get too much work.

Kris Baxter:

So we're starting to think, okay, well, we need to recruit and we've

Kris Baxter:

taken the view that we're going to recruit bottom depth, bottom up.

Kris Baxter:

So we'd be really successful in bringing trainees into the business, training

Kris Baxter:

them and some pop off to other practices.

Kris Baxter:

That's natural.

Kris Baxter:

Um, but most stay with us and they enjoy being with the practice.

Kris Baxter:

They've learned the way we like to do things, the way

Kris Baxter:

we want to approach projects.

Kris Baxter:

And, um, we're now basically talking to the local college and say, okay, well,

Kris Baxter:

you know, you've got guys, give me your best three to send to an interview.

Kris Baxter:

And we'll look at, um, offering them experience, work experience with a view

Kris Baxter:

to an end goal of a position, full time position once they're fully qualified.

Jon Clayton:

that sounds fantastic.

Jon Clayton:

Um, I love, I love the way that things have transformed for you in the practice

Jon Clayton:

and the fact that You know, it's not necessarily about growing financially

Jon Clayton:

with, with revenue and turnover, it's a bit of a vanity figure really, but

Jon Clayton:

actually the fact that that ratio, the split of the projects has changed, that

Jon Clayton:

that's had a positive impact on, um, reducing overheads and everyone's much

Jon Clayton:

happier working on those projects and the fact that you've got that plan in

Jon Clayton:

place to, um, recruit from the bottom up and to bring in some, um, some fresh

Jon Clayton:

talent into the practice and help.

Jon Clayton:

Train them and support them.

Jon Clayton:

I think that's amazing.

Jon Clayton:

So brilliant.

Jon Clayton:

I'm so glad to hear it.

Jon Clayton:

Um, Kris, what I was going to ask was, what would you say to anyone

Jon Clayton:

that's curious about being coached?

Kris Baxter:

I think find the coach that works for you.

Kris Baxter:

Do a bit of investigation work.

Kris Baxter:

Do a bit of, um, speaking to people that have worked with that coach.

Kris Baxter:

It's all about finding somebody that can work with you.

Kris Baxter:

If you're not going to get on, then it's just not going to work.

Kris Baxter:

But if you think you can work with them...

Kris Baxter:

Um, and be really open and honest and frank in the conversations you

Kris Baxter:

have between each other because, you know, as business owners, nobody

Kris Baxter:

likes to be told you're being silly and you're missing something out and

Kris Baxter:

you know, there's some obvious things you could do to make a life better.

Kris Baxter:

Nobody likes that, but that's probably the truth.

Kris Baxter:

And you know, we all need to hear those, those things sometimes.

Kris Baxter:

And equally on the flip side, coaches want to hear how they can do things better.

Kris Baxter:

They want to understand businesses and the differences in businesses.

Kris Baxter:

And I think that's really key for us is that we are a very specific type of

Kris Baxter:

business and you need to have a coach that has the right mindset to actually

Kris Baxter:

take a step back and go, okay, well I know all the principles, but I've got to

Kris Baxter:

apply that to something that is outside of my comfort zone in the minute and

Kris Baxter:

almost work together in doing that.

Jon Clayton:

That's great.

Jon Clayton:

I love that.

Jon Clayton:

Um, Kris, is there anything else that you wanted to say that we, we haven't

Jon Clayton:

covered in the course of the conversation?

Kris Baxter:

I think just be open minded about things.

Kris Baxter:

Set yourself some end goals.

Kris Baxter:

Make sure those goals are for you personally and how you want

Kris Baxter:

to, to take the business forward.

Kris Baxter:

Don't put yourself in a position where you're just going to a

Kris Baxter:

job because that's pointless.

Kris Baxter:

The stress is far too high for that.

Kris Baxter:

And, you know, be open minded to, to talking to other people.

Kris Baxter:

I, I, I talk to people now.

Kris Baxter:

I think, nah, that's not for me.

Kris Baxter:

I know myself well enough now that, you know, I can push things to the side.

Kris Baxter:

But equally, I think, oh, I really like that.

Kris Baxter:

Little nuggets of information from people.

Kris Baxter:

And equally, you know, work together.

Kris Baxter:

Don't always assume that the architectural practices around you are competition.

Kris Baxter:

Don't look over your shoulder.

Kris Baxter:

Don't worry about what they're doing.

Kris Baxter:

Worry about what you do, what you do well.

Kris Baxter:

And stick with that.

Jon Clayton:

That's great advice.

Jon Clayton:

Thanks, Kris.

Jon Clayton:

Um, I wanted to ask you a last question.

Jon Clayton:

That's actually not anything related to being coached.

Jon Clayton:

Um, I, I love discovering new places and travel, and I wondered

Jon Clayton:

if you could tell me about, well, tell me one of your favorite

Jon Clayton:

places and what you love about it.

Jon Clayton:

So this could be anywhere nearby, far, wherever you like.

Kris Baxter:

Ah, well we have a bit of a family tradition.

Kris Baxter:

And we started this, um, when I first met my wife and we were dating.

Kris Baxter:

And, um, we love the Norfolk coast.

Kris Baxter:

Kids love it.

Kris Baxter:

We love it.

Kris Baxter:

The beaches are fantastic.

Kris Baxter:

The only place I've been in the UK that is quite as nice is, is the

Kris Baxter:

Pembrokeshire coast in Wales, to be fair.

Kris Baxter:

Um, but we love the Norfolk coast.

Kris Baxter:

And our tradition is on New Year's Day, every single year

Kris Baxter:

without fail, we go to Wales.

Kris Baxter:

And, um, we love that because you've got the beach there, but the kids love

Kris Baxter:

the forest and like climbing the trees.

Kris Baxter:

We've got pictures of our 11 year old hanging off branches and things like that

Kris Baxter:

and it's just a happy place, I guess.

Kris Baxter:

Um, and we, on New Year's Day, we go there every single day,

Kris Baxter:

no matter what the weather is.

Kris Baxter:

It could be pouring down with rain, it could be sunshine.

Kris Baxter:

Um, we go there every single year and it is just a happy place for us as a family.

Kris Baxter:

And it's a place where we can all take a breath and reset.

Kris Baxter:

I guess we're thinking about, okay, well, what are we doing in the year ahead?

Kris Baxter:

And that's kind of how we view it.

Jon Clayton:

Oh, that's lovely.

Jon Clayton:

And that's a fantastic place.

Jon Clayton:

I love Wells as well.

Jon Clayton:

Um, that's a bit of a bit of a family favourite for us too.

Jon Clayton:

Um, Kris, thanks so much for your time today.

Jon Clayton:

Really appreciate it.

Jon Clayton:

Um, can you remind everyone where they can go online to, to connect

Jon Clayton:

with you and find out more about you?

Kris Baxter:

Sure.

Kris Baxter:

Yep.

Kris Baxter:

So, um, our website is studio11architecture.co.uk

Kris Baxter:

You'll see team members on there.

Kris Baxter:

You'll find contact details on there.

Kris Baxter:

I'm happy to have a chat with anybody, um, following this.

Kris Baxter:

If I can help other business owners, um, obviously, especially

Kris Baxter:

architecture business owners, then that would be fantastic.

Jon Clayton:

Awesome.

Jon Clayton:

Thanks so much, Kris.

Jon Clayton:

Next time, I'll be talking about side hustle, architectural services,

Jon Clayton:

and sharing a bit about how, uh, why I started my own side hustle.

Jon Clayton:

Thanks so much for listening to this episode of Architecture Business Club.

Jon Clayton:

If you liked this episode, think other people might enjoy it.

Jon Clayton:

Or just want to show your support, then please visit podchaser.com.

Jon Clayton:

Search for Architecture Business Club and leave a glowing five-star review.

Jon Clayton:

It would mean so much to me and makes it easier for new

Jon Clayton:

listeners to discover the show.

Jon Clayton:

If you just want to connect with me, you can do that on most social media

Jon Clayton:

platforms, just search for @mrjonclayton.

Jon Clayton:

The best place to connect with me online though is on LinkedIn.

Jon Clayton:

You can find a link to my profile in the show notes.

Jon Clayton:

Remember running your architecture business doesn't have to be hard.

Jon Clayton:

And you don't need to do it alone.

Jon Clayton:

This is Architecture Business Club.

Show artwork for Architecture Business Club - For Architects, Architectural Technologists, Surveyors & Designers

About the Podcast

Architecture Business Club - For Architects, Architectural Technologists, Surveyors & Designers
Helping busy architecture professionals build a better business with actionable tips and tactics.
Architecture Business Club is the weekly podcast to help solo and small firm architecture business owners build a profitable, future-proof architecture practice that both you and your clients love! It’s an inclusive place (for ALL architecture business owners). So whether you’re an Architect, Architectural Technologist, or Architectural Designer…If you sell architectural services and want to improve the way you do things…This is THE podcast for you.

I’m Jon Clayton, your show host, and a Chartered Architectural Technologist based in the UK. I’ve been in architecture for over two decades and running my own (solo) practice for 10 years+.

Each week you’ll hear from inspiring people from the world of architecture and business who share actionable tips to help you improve how you work, save time, or make more money. I’ll also share my own experiences running an architecture business in occasional solo episodes. We cover everything from mindset, money, business strategy, sales & marketing, productivity, systems & workflows, client experience, outsourcing, software, technology, and much more.

Episodes are kept as short as possible by cutting out the fluff and getting straight to the point. So expect interview episodes of around 30 minutes or less, and solo episodes of 5 to 15 minutes.

New episodes are released every Thursday at 6am GMT / 2am EST.

Welcome to the Club!

About your host

Profile picture for Jon Clayton

Jon Clayton

I’m Jon. A Chartered Architectural Technologist and the founder of Architecture Business Club. I've been working in architecture for over two decades and running my own architectural design business for over ten of those years. My mission is to help you build a better architecture business on your terms. So if you're a sole practitioner (or small practice) architect, architectural technologist, or architectural designer, I want to help YOU. I'm a Northerner but now live with my family in Norfolk, UK. Outside of work, I'm a guitar tottin', kayaking, movie trivia buff.